Hey Paul, Wayne has asked me to show you want we can do.

What to expect during
your branding journey Paul.

WE'VE READ THE BRIEF AND ARE READY TO GET CREATIVE WITH THIS EXCITING NEW E-BIKE PROJECT.

Like the 90’s electronic game BOP-IT, we twist it, spin it, pull it and use our creativity to shoehorn great design into a client’s brief.

We design for their audience, perform for the crowd and deliver a product that is an investment in both creativity and technology.

Our Branding Service includes

+ Fully research the market
+ Ask questions and then ask some more
+ Listen to our clients and their audience
+ Design 3 logo versions
+ Present Negative space versions
+ Present mock up verisons in real life situations
+ Amends and refinements
+ Presentations to client of final logo
+ Liase with Web design brief to create images and sized options + Deliver PSD, EPS and image files
+ Create Brand Guidelines Document

Lets discuss your identity

WHO IS YOUR IDEAL CUSTOMER?

If your brand hasn’t developed buyer persona profiles or robust profiles of your ideal customers, this is the first place to start. Your buyer personas should shape almost every aspect of your brand identity.

Determine what your buyer personas value from a brand. Are they looking for cost savings or the highest quality? Do they want deep relationships with their vendors or convenience? By understanding your ideal buyer’s pain points and priorities, you can formulate a relevant identity.

How Do You Make Your Clients Feel?

When your most satisfied new customers communicate with your sales or account management team, what do they have to say? Listening to the interactions of new, satisfied customers can reveal a wealth of information about how you make your customers feel. Do they express: Relief? Inspiration? New-found energy?
The most frequent positive emotion your customers associate with your company is critical information for building a brand identity. Use this emotion to select visual identity aspects, including the optimal colors and fonts.

What are Your Colors?

Humans associate colors with emotions. Your brand’s primary and supporting colors are an important component of your visual identity. By selecting colors that are associated with your brand values, you can instantly communicate your company’s mission.

Common color associations include:

Blue: Integrity, Trust, Tranquility, Loyalty, Intelligence

Green: Money, Growth, Freshness, Environmental-Friendliness

Yellow: Happiness, Originality, Energy

Purple: Royalty, Spirituality, Luxury

Pink: Femininity, Compassion, Playfulness

Red: Power, Strength, Passion

Orange: Courage, Originality, Success

White: Cleanliness, Purity, Freshness

Black: Elegance, Drama, Strength

It is important for global brands to take note that color associations can vary according to culture. Blue’s perception in the U.S. may be drastically different than in the Middle East.

 

What Kind of Personality Do You Have?

Brand personality is defined as a “human set of  characteristics” that are connected to a brand. Brands with a strong, well-defined personality instantly win some like-ability points because customers are able to relate to them on a personal level.

Human personalities are rarely single-faceted. Brand personalities shouldn’t be, either. When you are in the beginning stages of defining your personality, it may be helpful to think in terms of archetypes. Some household brands and associated personality archetypes could include:

Apple: Rebel
Taco Bell: Jester
REI: Outdoors-lover
Target: Bold
Subway: Optimist
Whole Foods: Peace-lover

What is Your Competition?

Competitive analysis can be a helpful first step towards developing any marketing strategy. Brand identity is no exception. The branding lessons you can glean from your competitors can vary significantly according to your industry, and the level of competition you’re facing.

Related: Make Customer Acquisition Your #1 Competitive Advantage

Your competitors could be textbook examples of poorly-defined brand identity. They may have little-to-no voice consistency across digital mediums, and a logo that’s unoriginal.

Perhaps they have an excellent brand identity that’s memorable, unique, and incredibly easy to like. Regardless of where your competitors stand, use their statuses as a starting place for creating a brand identity that’s
objectively better.

 

What’s Your Story?

Brand stories are an important component of branding. This includes both your literal history — such as how and why you were founded — and the story of the role you play in your customer’s life. Your brand’s story should ultimately make your customer a hero. Perhaps you’re able to make them more effective at their jobs, so they receive tons of compliments from their boss. Maybe your mortgage products help them purchase their first home and start a family. 

This story can be an important basis for your brand identity and marketing content. What are 5 Words that Describe You? An important exercise towards defining your brand’s identity can be developing a list of five adjectives that describe your brand’s personality, look, and voice. 

If Chik-Fil-A were to create a list, their five words might be: Quality Consistency Values Customer Service Commitment What drove you to start your company in the first place? How is your company different? By examining the values that run through your company, you can begin to develop a list of descriptive words.

 

WHAT ARE 5 WORDS THAT
DESCRIBE YOU?

 

An important exercise towards defining your brand’s
identity can be developing a list of five adjectives that
describe your brand’s personality, look, and voice. If
Chik-Fil-A were to create a list, their five words might
be:


Quality
Consistency
Values
Customer Service
Commitment


What drove you to start your company in the first
place? How is your company different? By examining
the values that run through your company, you can
begin to develop a list of descriptive words.

WHAT BRANDS DO YOU ADMIRE?

You don’t need to look towards brands with similar products, services or customers. Developing a list of brands you admire can offer various types of lessons that can be helpful. 

Perhaps you admire Boxed Water for their values-forward branding and minimalist aesthetic. Maybe you’re a huge fan of Zappos for their intense focus on company culture and customer service. These concepts can be translated to companies in a different sector.

How are You Different?

What does your brand offer that your competitors can’t? Perhaps more importantly, how can you communicate this in your brand identity?

Whole Foods is one of the most visible and well-known organic grocery chains. Their difference is communicated clearly in the brand’s logo, which is green and includes a leaf. It is important to note that simply being different isn’t enough. As branding blogger Tito Phillips highlights, you need to actively “make a difference.” 

This means actively carving out a niche, and continually playing to your strengths. Anyone who’s shopped at Whole Foods knows the grocery chain isn’t trying to compete on price. In order for Whole foods to maintain their “niche” of fresh, local, and specialty foods items, they can’t compete on price — and considering their brand identity, that’s perfectly fine.

HOW WE DELIVER YOUR BRAND

1. RESEARCH AND SCENESCAPE

A FULLY RESEARCHED GUIDE TO HOW WE SEE YOUR NEW BRAND. IMAGES / FONTS / GRAPHICS

2. POSITIVE AND NEGATIVE SPACE

HOW DOES THE LOGO LOOK IN MULTI SPACE

3. REAL LIFE MOCK UPS

CLOTHING / PRINT / SIGNAGE / HOW WILL THE LOGO LOOK IN DIFFERENT LIFE EVENTS

4. STYLE GUIDE

LOGO POSITIONING / COLOURS / PRINT GUIDE / DO'S & DONT'S / PRINTED AND DIGITAL VERSION

5. WEBSITE

DESKTOP / TABLET / MOBILE PHONE / APP DEV / DATABASE / E-COMMERCE / RESPONSIVE / DYNAMIC DATA

6. PRINT

BUSINESS CARDS / BROCHURES / CATALOGUES / BANNERS / SIGNAGE / POS / PACKAGING / MERCHANDISE

SO, YOU MUST HAVE A FEW QUESTIONS PAUL.

LETS CHAT